Russian Bolshoi arts director Filin hurt by acid attack

finn

The artistic director of Russia’s Bolshoi Theatre, Sergei Filin, is being treated in a Moscow hospital for severe burns to his face after a masked man threw acid in his face, police say.

The attack happened late on Thursday as Mr Filin, an award-winning ballet star, was walking home in central Moscow.

Doctors are now fighting to save his eyesight and Interfax news agency says he will be sent to a clinic abroad.

A Bolshoi spokesman said Mr Filin, 42, had suffered months of threats.

The BBC’s Steve Rosenberg in Moscow says it is suspected that he was the victim of infighting and rows between different groups of dancers at the Bolshoi.

According to the Bolshoi statement, the assailant shouted to Mr Filin as he was approaching the entrance to his apartment block, then threw acid in Mr Filin’s face.

Read the full article on the BBC web site here.

La Péri – Ballet in two acts

laperi

Vladimir Malakhov has drawn inspiration from historic lithographs to create a new staging of the romantic ballet LA PÉRI for the Staatsballett Berlin. Like the sylphids, the wilis and all the other unattainable fairy and elfin beings that populated the 19th century ballet stage in great numbers and in many new interpretations, the péris are oriental heavenly creatures that embody Prince Achmed’s yearning for another form of existence. A beautiful péri appears to him with her retinue and promises him redemption: she promises that the barrier between Heaven and Earth can be overcome by the power of love. The ballet LA PÉRI was first performed in 1843 at the Paris Opéra. Friedrich Burgmüller composed the music, and Théophile Gautier’s libretto was translated into dance by the choreographer Jean Coralli. Vladimir Malakhov’s interpretation of the ballet is expressed in a refined and delicate dance style, which was characteristic of the romantic era and follows naturally from the music. The stage and costume designer, Jordi Roig, has lovingly created an opulent, historic setting in which the atmosphere of the exotic scene is brought to life and the ballet can work its unique magic. [Source]

The Open Square by Itzik Galili

transform



Itzik Galili is one of the most active choreographers of his generation. Ever happy to try out new things, he is forever searching for new links to different art forms and intellectual worlds in his projects. One elementary characteristic of his work is the impartiality of style, eluding all definition. In one work he utilises a theatrical approach confronted with a pure abstract physicality and in the next a cool analysis chafes at a passionat study of energies with the dancers on pointe or even on roller skates if necessary for the realisation of the idea. Recently the power of Galilis choreographies have been determined by an intense physicality. In order to provoke the necessary disposition of the dancers, direct communication is the focus of the combined creative process, centred on given topics as well as every imaginable paraphrase or paradox that might appear on their mutual path. Following his choreography “The Sofa” which has already delighted the Berlin audience and the guest appearance of “Flatland” with Dansgroep Amsterdam in May 2010, Itzik Galili will now create a full length piece for the dancers of the Staatsballett Berlin. [Source / Source]

Dates:

12 February 2014

17, 23 March 2014

10, 15 April 2014

19 May 2014

Time: 19.30h

Komische Oper Berlin

Behrenstraße 55-57

10117 Berlin

[Source]

The Royal Ballet: Leaping beauties caught on camera

Royal-Ballet+free

The Royal Ballet’s top dancers wear quirky accessories and clothes by young British fashion designers in a new series of unconventional portraits.

Marianela Nuñez, who makes her debut in Onegin this month, has been captured as if in a Biba advert, wearing a head-piece and bejewelled outfit. And Sergei Polunin who dramatically walked out of the Royal Ballet last year and who will return as a guest artist to dance with Tamara Rojo as part of the Frederick Ashton mixed programme next month, can be seen flying through the air wearing a knitted leather neckpiece.

Read the full article here.

Now Is All There Is – Bodies in Motion, The Gallery at The Hospital Club, London WC2 (www.thehospitalclub.com) 25 to 27 January 2013.

Rudolf Nureyev gala at the Paris Opera

nureyev-2

Twenty years after his death, Rudolf Nureyev’s legacy still lights up the world of ballet as brilliantly as the flamboyant performances which once illuminated the greatest stages.

“As long as they are putting on my ballets, I will live on,” Brigitte Lefevre, dance director of the Paris Opera, recalls Nureyev saying in the years before the ravages of AIDS finally claimed him, aged 54, on January 6, 1993.

A fitting epitaph for a performer who went from being the outstanding male dancer of his generation to a choreographer whose influence resonates throughout modern ballet.

The Paris Opera hosts a gala night on Sunday, with his “Sleeping Beauty” running as part of its 2013/2014 season and his “Nutcracker” in 2014/2015.

London’s Royal Ballet this month stages Nureyev’s “Raymonda”, followed next month by “Marguerite and Armand”, while the Vienna Opera ballet plans a Nureyev gala on June 29 and San Francisco’s De Young Museum is showcasing his stage costumes until February.

And come September, the Kremlin ballet will perform his “Cinderella” — a milestone for Russia, where authorities stung by his defection blacked out all information about him even as his international career soared.

A posthumous homecoming for Nureyev, who had returned to his native land after 26 years in exile, only to find his ailing mother did not recognize him, and the Russian public knew nothing of his stellar rise.

Read the full article here.

Photo: Nureyev in his Paris apartment.

Chronicling Ballet’s Pain and Passion

henry

Roslyn Sulcas writes: The photographer Henry Leutwyler was building a career in fashion and portrait work in Paris in the late 1980s when he was sent on assignment to photograph Jorge Donn, the charismatic principal dancer who had risen to fame with Maurice Béjart’s Ballet of the 20th Century. The job proved to be a turning point for the Swiss-born Mr. Leutwyler, now 51, who subsequently spent time photographing Mr. Donn and his fellow dancers in Béjart’s company, which was based in Lausanne, Switzerland. After moving to New York in 1996 Mr. Leutwyler continued to take celebrity portraits but found a way back to dance when New York City Ballet hired him to document repertory pieces. One assignment turned into several more, and eventually he won permission to take pictures backstage, in class and rehearsal. The result is “Ballet: Photographs of the New York City Ballet,” (Steidl, $88), a weighty tome that offers a subtle, revealing view of the life of one of the world’s most prominent ballet companies.

See a selection of photos in The New York Times here.