Russian Police Say Dancer and Two Others Confess to Bolshoi Attack

The New York Times have published three articles about the Bolshoi acid attack:

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A dancer at the Bolshoi Ballet and two other men have confessed to carrying out an acid attack in January on the company’s artistic director, Sergei Filin, a crime that gripped Moscow and left one of Russia’s most revered institutions in turmoil, the police announced on Wednesday.

Read the full article.

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Prosecutors have yet to lay out a possible motive in the January attack on the Bolshoi Ballet’s artistic director, Sergei Filin, but the revelations of the past few days suggest that it may boil down to a ballerina.

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The Bolshoi Ballet soloist Pavel Dmitrichenko on Thursday tried to deflect blame for the January attack on Sergei Filin, the company’s artistic director. Mr. Dmitrichenko said he had agreed that an ex-convict acquaintance would “knock him around,” but that he was unaware that the man planned to douse Mr. Filin’s face with sulfuric acid, jeopardizing his eyesight.

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Chronicling Ballet’s Pain and Passion

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Roslyn Sulcas writes: The photographer Henry Leutwyler was building a career in fashion and portrait work in Paris in the late 1980s when he was sent on assignment to photograph Jorge Donn, the charismatic principal dancer who had risen to fame with Maurice Béjart’s Ballet of the 20th Century. The job proved to be a turning point for the Swiss-born Mr. Leutwyler, now 51, who subsequently spent time photographing Mr. Donn and his fellow dancers in Béjart’s company, which was based in Lausanne, Switzerland. After moving to New York in 1996 Mr. Leutwyler continued to take celebrity portraits but found a way back to dance when New York City Ballet hired him to document repertory pieces. One assignment turned into several more, and eventually he won permission to take pictures backstage, in class and rehearsal. The result is “Ballet: Photographs of the New York City Ballet,” (Steidl, $88), a weighty tome that offers a subtle, revealing view of the life of one of the world’s most prominent ballet companies.

See a selection of photos in The New York Times here.